Successful children living on rail platforms

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Many people will know young people well like Vicky Rai and Pankaj Gupta. Vicky Rai is a well-known photographer and Pankaj Gupta is a theater director and actor. A lot of people must have seen him in the movie Oye Lucky, Lucky Oye. While he was busy helping those most in need with the money raised during the Crown pandemic, Gaurav, a 12-year-old student, was teaching school children how to use computers in the shelter. The childhood of these young entrepreneurs has been full of difficulties. Their life tells society that children who are somehow marginalized in the social fabric, if given the right help at the right opportunity and time, can emerge as heroes by delivering positive results for the society.

Worried about poverty and fed up with fights with his older brother, Gaurav had fled a village called Bina in Madhya Pradesh during his childhood. He says, “The next evening, when the train stopped at Mathura, I got off. A group of children from the station, some older and some younger, befriended me after seeing me alone. He gave me food and water and I started working with him at the station.We used to collect used plastic bottles on the trains.For four or five months, Mathura railway station was Gaurav’s house.

After that he arrived in New Delhi, where as soon as he got off at the station, the team operating the Lajpat Nagar shelter took him under his protection. He later got a job at a wallet factory, but fell ill after working there. They had to return to Delhi train station in search of food, where a GRP official gave them the option to stay at the Salaam Balak Trust or return home. He joined the DMRC Salaam Balak Shelter Home Facility in Tis Hazari, Delhi, where he was admitted to an English middle school in Pratap Nagar. Gaurav is studying marine science at the Wells Institute of Science Technology and Advanced Studies, Chennai.

Vicky is a few years older than Gaurav. Its history begins in Purulia in West Bengal. He left Purulia at the age of 11 after being severely beaten by his grandmother. Vicky hoped that one day she would become a great actor. With this hope he came to Delhi. Although their place here was only Delhi train station. Vicky’s journey to become a well-known photographer has also been completed with the support of Salaam Balak Trust. Vicky was also shortlisted for the MIT Media Fellowship in 2014 and the Forbes Asia 30 Under-30 list in 2016.

Similarly, at the age of eleven, Mohammad Shamim of Jharkhand fled his home in Madhupur in New Delhi. “I knew so much that a lot of people in my village work in Delhi,” he says. Shamim says, ‘I was standing near a poplar tree outside the station, when a man approached me and asked,’ Would you study? ‘I said yes.’ Shamim says he had all sorts of apprehensions in his head at the time, “Will anyone misuse him somewhere? But contrary to his apprehensions, his life changed. He received training in the puppet show at the Salaam Balak.” Trust: Today, the puppet made by Shamim took part in this year’s Republic Day parade.

Pankaj’s father was poor and had a dhaba in the Jhinjhak area of ​​Uttar Pradesh. Pankaj, plagued by poverty, was working in his father’s dhaba when he first met members of the Salaam Balak Trust (SBT). Pankaj is 32 years old today and is an experienced theater artist and instructor. He has also acted in many films. He has directed several works independently since 2015. Of these, Unique Journey and Street Dreams have become especially popular. (rotation function)

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Many people will know young people well like Vicky Rai and Pankaj Gupta. Vicky Rai is a well-known photographer and Pankaj Gupta is a theater director and actor. A lot of people must have seen him in the movie Oye Lucky, Lucky Oye. While he was busy helping those most in need with the money raised during the Crown pandemic, Gaurav, a 12-year-old student, was teaching school children how to use computers in the shelter. The childhood of these young entrepreneurs has been full of difficulties. Their life tells society that children who are somehow marginalized in the social fabric, if given the right help at the right opportunity and time, can emerge as heroes by delivering positive results for the society.

Worried about poverty and fed up with fights with his older brother, Gaurav had fled a village called Bina in Madhya Pradesh during his childhood. He says, “The next evening, when the train stopped at Mathura, I got off. A group of children from the station, some older and some younger, befriended me after seeing me alone. He gave me food and water and I started working with him at the station.We used to collect used plastic bottles on the trains.For four or five months, Mathura railway station was Gaurav’s house.

After that he arrived in New Delhi, where as soon as he got off at the station, the team operating the Lajpat Nagar shelter took him under his protection. He later got a job at a wallet factory, but fell ill after working there. They had to return to Delhi train station in search of food, where a GRP official gave them the option to stay at the Salaam Balak Trust or return home. He joined the DMRC Salaam Balak Shelter Home Facility in Tis Hazari, Delhi, where he was admitted to an English middle school in Pratap Nagar. Gaurav is studying marine science at the Wells Institute of Science Technology and Advanced Studies, Chennai.

Vicky is a few years older than Gaurav. Its history begins in Purulia in West Bengal. He left Purulia at the age of 11 after being severely beaten by his grandmother. Vicky hoped that one day she would become a great actor. With this hope he came to Delhi. Although their place here was only Delhi train station. Vicky’s journey to become a well-known photographer has also been completed with the support of Salaam Balak Trust. Vicky was also shortlisted for the MIT Media Fellowship in 2014 and the Forbes Asia 30 Under-30 list in 2016.

Similarly, at the age of eleven, Mohammad Shamim of Jharkhand fled his home in Madhupur in New Delhi. “I knew so much that a lot of people in my village work in Delhi,” he says. Shamim says, ‘I was standing near a poplar tree outside the station, when a man approached me and asked,’ Would you study? ‘I said yes.’ Shamim says he had all sorts of apprehensions in his head at the time, “Will anyone misuse him somewhere? But contrary to his apprehensions, his life changed. He received training in the puppet show at the Salaam Balak.” Trust: Today, the puppet made by Shamim took part in this year’s Republic Day parade.

Pankaj’s father was poor and had a dhaba in the Jhinjhak area of ​​Uttar Pradesh. Pankaj, plagued by poverty, was working in his father’s dhaba when he first met members of the Salaam Balak Trust (SBT). Pankaj is 32 years old today and is an experienced theater artist and instructor. He has also acted in many films. He has directed several works independently since 2015. Of these, Unique Journey and Street Dreams have become especially popular. (rotation function)

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