Prove them wrong: Pak’s first female Hindu DSP Manisha Ropeta aims to be women’s protector.

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Defying all odds, Pakistan’s Manisha Ropeta has proved her relatives wrong by becoming the first Indian woman Deputy Superintendent of Police. With this, she is ready to become a protective woman, gender equality in a patriarchal society and face new challenges.

Manisha Ropeta, 26, a resident of Jacobabad in Sindh province, believes that in male-dominated Pakistan, women are the target of many crimes and they (the women) are the most oppressed people.

He secured 16th rank in the Public Service Commission examination
Ropeta had cleared the Sindh Public Service Commission examination last year. He was ranked 16th in the merit list out of 152 shortlisted candidates. She is currently undergoing training and will later be posted as a DSP in the crime-affected area of ​​Lyari.

“My sisters and I have seen the old system of patriarchy since childhood where girls are told that if they want to be educated and work they can only be teachers or doctors,” said Ropeta.

Coming from a middle-class family, Ropeta says she wants to dispel the notion that girls from good families should avoid joining the police service or working in district courts.

Society needs a policewoman: Manisha
Ropeta says, “Women are the most oppressed and the target of many crimes in our society. I joined the police force because I believe we need a protective woman in our society.”

Pakistan is considered one of the worst countries in the world for women due to cases of physical and sexual violence against women, honor killings and forced marriages. A few years ago, the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Index had ranked Pakistan third from the bottom. Pakistan ranks 151 out of 153 countries.

70% of women victims of domestic violence in Pakistan
According to another report by the Aurat Foundation, a Pakistani NGO working for women’s rights, almost seventy percent of women in the country have been victims of domestic violence at least once in their lives. This violence is usually done by their husbands.

Ropeta believes that her work as a senior police officer will empower and empower women. She says, I want to lead a feminist campaign and encourage gender equality in the police force. He added: “I myself have always been very inspired and attracted to the role of the police.

The mother took care after the death of the father
Ropeta’s three sisters are doctors and her youngest daughter is studying medicine. His father was a businessman in Jacobabad. Ropeta died when he was 13 years old. After the death of the father, his mother was forced to live with her children. Where he was raised by his mother.

Ropeta recalls that it was not common for girls to pursue higher education in her hometown and when her relatives heard that she was joining the police force, they thought that she would not last long in such a difficult profession. But I have proved them wrong.

He has failed one mark in MBBS exam
Asked what led her to opt for a different profession, Ropeta said she had failed the MBBS entrance exam by one mark. She says that then I told my family that I was pursuing a degree in physical therapy, but at the same time I prepared for the Public Service Commission exams and secured 16th rank out of 468 candidates.

Ropeta, however, admitted that being in a higher position than the Sindh Police and receiving field training in a place like Lyari is not easy. He said his peers, seniors and juniors, treat him with respect for his ideas and hard work.

Before Ropeta, Pushpa Kumari from Umerkot district had also cleared a similar test and joined the Sindh Police as a Hindu First Assistant Sub-Inspector.

According to the World Economic Forum, five thousand women are killed in the name of honor every year in Pakistan. In September 2019, the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan sounded the alarm about the plight of women, saying that in 2020, 430 cases of honor killings were reported in the country.

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Defying all odds, Pakistan’s Manisha Ropeta has proved her relatives wrong by becoming the first Indian woman Deputy Superintendent of Police. With this, she is ready to become a protective woman, gender equality in a patriarchal society and face new challenges.

Manisha Ropeta, 26, a resident of Jacobabad in Sindh province, believes that in male-dominated Pakistan, women are the target of many crimes and they (the women) are the most oppressed people.

He secured 16th rank in the Public Service Commission examination

Ropeta had cleared the Sindh Public Service Commission examination last year. He was ranked 16th in the merit list out of 152 shortlisted candidates. She is currently undergoing training and will later be posted as a DSP in the crime-affected area of ​​Lyari.

“My sisters and I have seen the old system of patriarchy since childhood where girls are told that if they want to be educated and work they can only be teachers or doctors,” said Ropeta.

Coming from a middle-class family, Ropeta says she wants to dispel the notion that girls from good families should avoid joining the police service or working in district courts.

Society needs a policewoman: Manisha

Ropeta says, “Women are the most oppressed and the target of many crimes in our society. I joined the police force because I believe we need a protective woman in our society.”

Pakistan is considered one of the worst countries in the world for women due to cases of physical and sexual violence against women, honor killings and forced marriages. A few years ago, the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Index had ranked Pakistan third from the bottom. Pakistan ranks 151 out of 153 countries.

70% of women victims of domestic violence in Pakistan

According to another report by the Aurat Foundation, a Pakistani NGO working for women’s rights, almost seventy percent of women in the country have been victims of domestic violence at least once in their lives. This violence is usually done by their husbands.

Ropeta believes that her work as a senior police officer will empower and empower women. She says, I want to lead a feminist campaign and encourage gender equality in the police force. He added: “I myself have always been very inspired and attracted to the role of the police.

The mother took care after the death of the father

Ropeta’s three sisters are doctors and her youngest daughter is studying medicine. His father was a businessman in Jacobabad. Ropeta died when he was 13 years old. After the death of the father, his mother was forced to live with her children. Where he was raised by his mother.

Ropeta recalls that it was not common for girls to pursue higher education in her hometown and when her relatives heard that she was joining the police force, they thought that she would not last long in such a difficult profession. But I have proved them wrong.

He has failed one mark in MBBS exam

Asked what led her to opt for a different profession, Ropeta said she had failed the MBBS entrance exam by one mark. She says that then I told my family that I was pursuing a degree in physical therapy, but at the same time I prepared for the Public Service Commission exams and secured 16th rank out of 468 candidates.

Ropeta, however, admitted that being in a higher position than the Sindh Police and receiving field training in a place like Lyari is not easy. He said his peers, seniors and juniors, treat him with respect for his ideas and hard work.

Before Ropeta, Pushpa Kumari from Umerkot district had also cleared a similar test and joined the Sindh Police as a Hindu First Assistant Sub-Inspector.

According to the World Economic Forum, five thousand women are killed in the name of honor every year in Pakistan. In September 2019, the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan sounded the alarm about the plight of women, saying that in 2020, 430 cases of honor killings were reported in the country.

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