Courage to honor a profession – Courage to honor one’s profession: professional life affects the creation and relationships of literature even in failure

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Today ‘Cobbler’ is a global leather goods brand. There are no people of any particular case working in this company. But the people of this profession were not seen with respect in the social structure. The cobbler himself considers his job and his caste inferior. Most people associated with this profession do not want their identity to be associated with their children. Most of the shoe craftsmen hang the painting of Sant Raidas in their shop. Here, the images of Dr. Ambedkar have also started hanging in these shops for two decades.

Biographers have written that when the financial situation of the father of Dr. Ambedkar deteriorated due to suspension of pension after retirement, he started working as a shoe maker. The boy Ambedkar also helped his father after school. But that’s not the case now. About thirty years ago Rajat Rani ‘Meenu’, along with the author of these lines, tried to take a photo in a shoe shop with her camera, but she scolded him saying ‘You don’t know what a big man he is. my son ‘. If my image is printed, who will respect it?’

In this situation, the famous Punjabi writer and translator Dwarka Raju Bharti deserves congratulations. He is doing literary service while preparing shoes in Jalandhar, Punjab. The title of his autobiography is Mochi. He has full respect for his profession. The exciting chapter of his autobiography is ‘Smoldering Lava’. He wrote, “My spiritual relationship with my father-in-law Maniram was broken, the more efforts were made to reconnect, the more they fell apart. Maybe this will be the first father-in-law in the world to make fun of his son-in-law’s business . To what extent was it justified to make fun of that work for which his daughter fills her stomach by eating bread, children grow? Thinking about this, the eddies that grew inside me did not let me sleep at night .

A person’s professional life affects their relationships. In the foreword of this book it is written, “A boy from Haryana was a teacher of Sanskrit in Tamil Nadu.” Their wedding invitations were printed. When the girl’s family learned that the boy’s family still made shoes, they split up.

In this way, shoe manufacturers are found in every city in the country. Women are also found doing this job in Chennai. These days, apart from the student who was killed by a teacher in Rajasthan, another video is going viral. Hindi poet Rambabu Gautam is promoting it extensively from New Jersey, America. This is the video of Roshan Singh Ramdasiya, who sits in the suit-boots, tie, hat to prepare the shoes. He says that after losing his job in a yarn mill, he started polishing his ancestral profession at Hanumangarhi, near the Ganganagar railway gate.

The issue of cobblers is global. There is also a cobbler of stories in the world’s best stories collected by Mamta Kalia, with author John Galsworthy. In this, the shoemaker, Mr. Gesler, who has great faith in his workforce, is saddened by changing consumer trends. The story is based on the influence of consumer culture and the emerging market, when leather was replaced by cheap rubber footwear, machine work and craftsmanship flourished.

Not England or India, the whole world is in the hands of marketing. The faces of many of these great craftsmen also flash in the memory of the author of these lines, the fine shoe business was crushed by the advent of rubber soles and machines. He left the workshop and sat on the pavement, mending and polishing his shoes, less and less in the eyes of the people.

Hans published an autobiography in the July 2007 issue of Here Ek Cobbler Residence, in which a 10-12-year-old boy sat at the Dibai railway crossing during 1970-72 polishing his boots. He used to throw money from the pitcher and spend his free time on pavement books. He later became a master writer, so what is this short of a miracle?

Autobiographies like Dwarka Raju Bharati have appeared in Punjabi before, but they were less Dalit conscious. Lal Singh ‘Dil’ wrote in his autobiography Dastan, “The police used to kill Naxalites, they used to hit four poles and more in the name of caste.” Lal Singh ‘Dil’ died prematurely due to hunger and poverty. Although it is also true that the book contained the frustration of the radicalism of the revolution, the Dalit vision was not.

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Today ‘Cobbler’ is a global leather goods brand. There are no people of any particular case working in this company. But the people of this profession were not seen with respect in the social structure. The cobbler himself considers his job and his caste inferior. Most people associated with this profession do not want their identity to be associated with their children. Most of the shoe craftsmen hang the painting of Sant Raidas in their shop. Here are the photos of Dr. Ambedkar have also started hanging in these shops for two decades.

Biographers have written that when the financial situation of the father of Dr. Ambedkar deteriorated due to suspension of pension after retirement, he started working as a shoe maker. The boy Ambedkar also helped his father after school. But that’s not the case now. About thirty years ago Rajat Rani ‘Meenu’, along with the author of these lines, tried to take a photo in a shoe shop with her camera, but she scolded him saying ‘You don’t know what a big man he is. my son ‘. If my image is printed, who will respect it?’

In this situation, the famous Punjabi writer and translator Dwarka Raju Bharti deserves congratulations. He is doing literary service while preparing shoes in Jalandhar, Punjab. The title of his autobiography is Mochi. He has full respect for his profession. The exciting chapter of his autobiography is ‘Smoldering Lava’. He wrote, “My spiritual relationship with my father-in-law Maniram was broken, the more efforts were made to reconnect, the more they fell apart. Maybe this will be the first father-in-law in the world to make fun of his son-in-law’s business . To what extent was it justified to make fun of that work for which his daughter fills her stomach by eating bread, children grow? Thinking about this, the eddies that grew inside me did not let me sleep at night .

A person’s professional life affects their relationships. In the foreword of this book it is written, “A boy from Haryana was a teacher of Sanskrit in Tamil Nadu.” Their wedding invitations were printed. When the girl’s family learned that the boy’s family still made shoes, they split up.

In this way, shoe manufacturers are found in every city in the country. Women are also found doing this job in Chennai. These days, apart from the student who was killed by a teacher in Rajasthan, another video is going viral. Hindi poet Rambabu Gautam is promoting it extensively from New Jersey, America. This is the video of Roshan Singh Ramdasiya, who sits in the suit-boots, tie, hat to prepare the shoes. He says that after losing his job in a yarn mill, he started polishing his ancestral profession at Hanumangarhi, near the Ganganagar railway gate.

The issue of cobblers is global. There is also a cobbler of stories in the world’s best stories collected by Mamta Kalia, with author John Galsworthy. In this, the shoemaker, Mr. Gesler, who has great faith in his workforce, is saddened by changing consumer trends. The story is based on the influence of consumer culture and the emerging market, when leather was replaced by cheap rubber footwear, machine work and craftsmanship flourished.

Not England or India, the whole world is in the hands of marketing. The faces of many of these great craftsmen also flash in the memory of the author of these lines, the fine shoe business was crushed by the advent of rubber soles and machines. He left the workshop and sat on the pavement, mending and polishing his shoes, less and less in the eyes of the people.

Hans published an autobiography in the July 2007 issue of Here Ek Cobbler Residence, in which a 10-12-year-old boy sat at the Dibai railway crossing during 1970-72 polishing his boots. He used to throw money from the pitcher and spend his free time on pavement books. He later became a master writer, so what is this short of a miracle?

Autobiographies like Dwarka Raju Bharati have appeared in Punjabi before, but they were less Dalit conscious. Lal Singh ‘Dil’ wrote in his autobiography Dastan, “The police used to kill Naxalites, they used to hit four poles and more in the name of caste.” Lal Singh ‘Dil’ died prematurely due to hunger and poverty. Although it is also true that the book contained the frustration of the radicalism of the revolution, the Dalit vision was not.

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