Women journalists in Pakistan are fighting for equality amid a high risk of threats of violence

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The gender pay gap, gender bias and unfair treatment of female employees in Pakistan are rampant. The condition of women working as journalists in the South Asian country is also no secret to the world.
Pakistan has consistently ranked at the bottom of rankings for freedom of expression. It is also at a lower level in the online space. Women especially endure harassment and abuse. Women journalists are further exposed to violence and threats due to the strict patriarchal social norms in Pakistan.

According to a Pakistani journalist, “Women have played an important role in the Pakistani media. The sensitivity of reporting and the candid style of writing is a sign of women’s progress. Despite this significant change, their representation in the screen and off screen is still very high. low. has to face its own challenges.”

There has also been a strong gender bias in the nature of the beatings given to women journalists. The nature of beats such as environment, climate, health are considered “soft”, while they are still considered “inefficient” to cover politics, sports, crime and economics.

According to the report of a leading Pakistani newspaper, the common and difficult reason for this is the same: gender stereotypes. Usually because it’s easy to judge abilities based on gender based on women and difficult because, given the opportunity, it increases the pressure to get it right the first time.

Citing a report by the media watchdog Freedom Network, the author said there are very few women in senior management positions in the media industry who identify as journalists in the Pakistan.

The data also shows that less than 5% of Pakistan’s estimated 20,000 journalists are women. However, recent debates and discussions have generated an important debate about the safety of women in the workplace who report in the field or work in the office. These debates have brought transparency to women’s work experience, to their safety and to workplace practices that pose a challenge to their productivity.

The online space is not safe either. Women journalists face a large number of threats in the form of rape, physical violence and intimidation for disclosing their personal data publicly on a daily basis.

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The gender pay gap, gender bias and unfair treatment of female employees in Pakistan are rampant. The condition of women working as journalists in the South Asian country is also no secret to the world.

Pakistan has consistently ranked at the bottom of rankings for freedom of expression. It is also at a lower level in the online space. Women especially endure harassment and abuse. Women journalists are further exposed to violence and threats due to the strict patriarchal social norms in Pakistan.

According to a Pakistani journalist, “Women have played an important role in the Pakistani media. The sensitivity of reporting and the candid style of writing is a sign of women’s progress. Despite this significant change, their representation in the screen and off screen is still very high. low. has to face its own challenges.”

There has also been a strong gender bias in the nature of the beatings given to women journalists. The nature of beats such as environment, climate, health are considered “soft”, while they are still considered “inefficient” to cover politics, sports, crime and economics.

According to the report of a leading Pakistani newspaper, the common and difficult reason for this is the same: gender stereotypes. Usually because it’s easy to judge abilities based on gender based on women and difficult because, given the opportunity, it increases the pressure to get it right the first time.

Citing a report by the media watchdog Freedom Network, the author said there are very few women in senior management positions in the media industry who identify as journalists in the Pakistan.

The data also shows that less than 5% of Pakistan’s estimated 20,000 journalists are women. However, recent debates and discussions have generated an important debate about the safety of women in the workplace who report in the field or work in the office. These debates have brought transparency to women’s work experience, to their safety and to workplace practices that pose a challenge to their productivity.

The online space is not safe either. Women journalists face a large number of threats in the form of rape, physical violence and intimidation for disclosing their personal data publicly on a daily basis.

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