Happiness Index: How Happy Are “Happy” Countries? Divorce rate is very high – Happiness index: How happy are the “happy” countries? very high divorce rate

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In recent years, when indices based on Gross National Product (GNP) and income have been deemed not only inadequate but misleading, more emphasis has been placed on finding out how happy people in a country are. This is why the happiness index or happiness index was created. In all indices of happiness or happiness, it has been found that Nordic countries often top all these indices. The Nordic countries are mainly counted as five countries in Europe, although sometimes some nearby islets are also counted separately. These five countries are Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland and Denmark. Often, one or the other of these countries is at the top of the happiness index.

But only a very small part of the world’s population lives in the Nordic countries, which is about one percent of the world’s population. In such a situation, many people were curious to know why people are so happy there. On the other hand, some scholars from these Nordic countries also began to say that we are not as happy as the world tells us. One issue that arose amid this conflict is that the divorce rate is often very high in the Nordic countries. If we look at the statistics of the various Nordic countries in recent years, the divorce rate has been found to be between 35 and 60 percent. In other words, every second or third marriage here ends in divorce, and sometimes the rate is even higher. Some sociologists say about it that it has no special adverse effect on the happiness or happiness of people’s lives. Their point of view is that it is a matter of freedom for people to be in a relationship as long as they are happy in it.

On the other hand, many studies carried out in the European context show that, whatever may be said at first sight, the truth is that almost all cases of divorce are related to tensions and conflicts. For example, Richard Downthwaite, in his book The Growth Illusion, points out that most cases of divorce and separation involve a great deal of stress, the effects of which last for years. It has a very adverse effect especially on children. Children who come from broken families are at greater risk of many adverse situations in their lives. Data from the UK’s National Survey of Health and Development shows that children’s development and mental health are adversely affected in homes where parent-child relationships break down.

Many studies in the Nordic regions have also reported that the problem of mental stress and depression has been found more in teenagers and young adults. By the way, this problem has increased in most western countries in recent times and in America it is at its peak right now. In 2021, some major child and adolescent health organizations in America declared a child and adolescent health emergency. The state of child, adolescent, and youth mental health in the Nordic countries is not as dire as in the United States, but it is much higher. Several studies have found that between 10 and 25 percent of teenagers and young adults in this age group suffer from mental health problems. It has also increased significantly recently, especially in Norway.

Thus, while there has been a need to make the happiness index more complete, there has also been a need to balance the hyperbolic understanding of happiness in the Nordic countries. The truth is that the happiness indices have not yet become very complete and their shortcomings are also being pointed out from the Nordic countries.

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In recent years, when indices based on Gross National Product (GNP) and income have been deemed not only inadequate but misleading, more emphasis has been placed on finding out how happy people in a country are. This is why the happiness index or happiness index was created. In all indices of happiness or happiness, it has been found that Nordic countries often top all these indices. The Nordic countries are mainly counted as five countries in Europe, although sometimes some nearby islets are also counted separately. These five countries are Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland and Denmark. Often, one or the other of these countries is at the top of the happiness index.

But only a very small part of the world’s population lives in the Nordic countries, which is about one percent of the world’s population. In such a situation, many people were curious to know why people are so happy there. On the other hand, some scholars from these Nordic countries also began to say that we are not as happy as the world tells us. One issue that arose amid this conflict is that the divorce rate is often very high in the Nordic countries. If we look at the statistics of the various Nordic countries in recent years, the divorce rate has been found to be between 35 and 60 percent. In other words, every second or third marriage here ends in divorce, and sometimes the rate is even higher. Some sociologists say about it that it has no special adverse effect on the happiness or happiness of people’s lives. Their point of view is that it is a matter of freedom for people to be in a relationship as long as they are happy in it.

On the other hand, many studies carried out in the European context show that, whatever may be said at first sight, the truth is that almost all cases of divorce are related to tensions and conflicts. For example, Richard Downthwaite, in his book The Growth Illusion, points out that most cases of divorce and separation involve a great deal of stress, the effects of which last for years. It has a very adverse effect especially on children. Children who come from broken families are at greater risk of many adverse situations in their lives. Data from the UK’s National Survey of Health and Development shows that children’s development and mental health are adversely affected in homes where parent-child relationships break down.

Many studies in the Nordic regions have also reported that the problem of mental stress and depression has been found more in teenagers and young adults. By the way, this problem has increased in most western countries in recent times and in America it is at its peak right now. In 2021, some major child and adolescent health organizations in America declared a child and adolescent health emergency. The state of child, adolescent, and youth mental health in the Nordic countries is not as severe as in the United States, but it is much higher. Several studies have found that between 10 and 25 percent of teenagers and young adults in this age group suffer from mental health problems. It has also increased significantly recently, especially in Norway.

Thus, while there has been a need to make the happiness index more complete, there has also been a need to balance the hyperbolic understanding of happiness in the Nordic countries. The truth is that the happiness indices have not yet become very complete and their shortcomings are also being pointed out from the Nordic countries.

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